Friendship

How many friends do you have?  Best friends, close friends, acquaintances?  Can you ever have too many? Do you count online friends as real friends?I have several offline friends as well as a lot of online friends. The interesting aspect is this, I spend more time keeping in contact with and communicating with my online friends than I do with my offline friends. Is that weird to anyone else but me? Or do I not spend enough time with my offline friends? Some people fall into both categories, both online and offline friends.Just curious as to what others think.While pondering that question, here is another one; what does it take to be a real friend or a close friend to you? I think that online friends assume that they know us more than they actually do. Let’s face it, do we put everything about ourselves on our profiles on Facebook and Twitter? Probably not.Another point to ponder; can online friends become close friends or even clients and referral sources? I think they can, but, just as with friendships or relationships that develop offline, it takes time! Online friendships and offline friendships take time! As one of my referral partners puts it, “you can’t go to third base on the first date!”Let me know your thoughts on friendship; what does it take to be a friend to you?John

Comments

  1. Heather @ Desperately Seeking Sanity says:

    I think that we assume we spend more time developing online friends because alot of us are online ALL.DAY.LONG. and our offline friends are not. There fore when it comes to quantity of time, they do receive alot.But the whole QUALITY thing comes into play when you meet up with offline friends and continue to build and grow that relationship.It’s easier for me to meet friends online than it is off. Workign from home doesn’t afford me the opportunity to meet new people unless i’m hanging out with the PTA moms and I’m not a PTA mom. So I don’t like most of them. :)I’m an open book for the most part online. When you finally arrange a tweet up (grin) you’ll see that I’m the same way online and off. And I like it that way.Brad met his wife online? I think I like knowing that because if HE can find a spouse? Then I know that I should be able to as well. :DAnd how come I didn’t know that you had a blog? I would’ve been commenting had I known!!!

  2. businessgolf says:

    John,Very good point and questions.I think a lot of people..by a lot I mean, 80% of people who are online a significant part of the day..by significant I mean, four hours total or more, tend to rely on making Online Friends more than offline friends.I feel a balance of online and offline friends is needed which is what I strive for each day.I have a concern with relying on just online friendships. There are so many people online attempting to create relationships and friendships just so they can work a scam on the people they make friends with. I am very concerned with this growing trend.

  3. John, very well-made and well-taken points. I think "friends" made via social media, chat rooms (do those still exist?), etc. all have potential. To become trusted allies in whatever business or political battles you involve yourself in. To be good listeners to vent to on days when the world doesn’t turn your way. To become offline friends, as well. Or they can, as ‘businessgolf’ said, attempt (sometimes successfully) to run a scam on you and ruin your reputation, business, credit, and other relationships. I don’t take quite as wary a view as others on this matter because, as you pointed out, we don’t really put ourselves "all the way out there" online. I’ve had numerous online personas over the years and, for the most part, what you project online is simply what you WANT others to see, how you WANT the person on the other end of the internet tube to view you. As social media evolves, this may become less true for some than others. And that’s okay. The interwebs will always provide a great deal of anonymity, barring some radical (and very staunchly resisted) legislation.Does this anonymity, this apparent lack of culpability, remove the incentive to treat others with respect and honesty, thereby facilitating those who would commit serious fraud? I don’t know. Much smarter folks than I have had stalemated discussions on that topic.But where is social media going?Personally, with my MySpace and FaceBook accounts, the bloom has fallen off the rose. I log on maybe once a month, while Twitter is almost a constant. In our "short attention span" society, it’s not surprising.And, technically, I met my wife online. (A mutual friend gave her my email address and we corresponded for a month or so before meeting in person, even though we lived only 45 minutes apart.) And the rest is… well, you know the rest.Bottom line as far as scammers, though, there always have and always will be dishonest and unscrupulous people in any society. But that is why EVERY online source for meeting new people has a "Block" or "Report Abuse" function.Use wisely your power of choice.

  4. Heather @ Desperately Seeking Sanity says:

    I think that we assume we spend more time developing online friends because alot of us are online ALL.DAY.LONG. and our offline friends are not. There fore when it comes to quantity of time, they do receive alot.But the whole QUALITY thing comes into play when you meet up with offline friends and continue to build and grow that relationship.It’s easier for me to meet friends online than it is off. Workign from home doesn’t afford me the opportunity to meet new people unless i’m hanging out with the PTA moms and I’m not a PTA mom. So I don’t like most of them. :)I’m an open book for the most part online. When you finally arrange a tweet up (grin) you’ll see that I’m the same way online and off. And I like it that way.Brad met his wife online? I think I like knowing that because if HE can find a spouse? Then I know that I should be able to as well. :DAnd how come I didn’t know that you had a blog? I would’ve been commenting had I known!!!

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